Mandating additional

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Since the health law established a comprehensive set of “essential health benefits” that individual and small group plans must cover (unless they existed prior to passage of the law in 2010), it was hoped that mandates would no longer be much in demand, says Sabrina Corlette, project director at Georgetown University’s Center On Health Insurance Reforms.

Mandates are “not the most rational way to build a benefit package,” says Corlette.

The cost of health care in the Netherlands is higher than the European average but is less than in the United States.

The devastating societal effects of the national opioid crisis are as far reaching as they are complex and require multimodal and highly coordinated interventions involving policy makers, public health, law enforcement, the medical community, payers, and community stakeholders.

In the face of this crisis, policy makers and health care providers have responded vigorously with numerous recommendations and proposed reforms to reduce the risk of harm.

While we applaud the recognition of the problem and the effort to solve it, it is imperative that recommendations, and particularly mandates, are evidence-based and are not so costly that they jeopardize alternative, proven strategies.

One approach that is gaining energy both at state and national levels would be to require payers to cover abuse-deterrent opioids.

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